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Talking about FOREVER FINLEY with Author Holly Schindler (Part 2)

forever finley

True love never dies – or so Amos Hargrove, a brave Civil War soldier who lost his beloved before they could marry, still believes.  His spirit, some say, pervades the town he founded and named for his sweet fair-haired young beauty.  In Finley, dreams come true, love blossoms, and second chances are unearthed.  Is Amos’s spirit truly at work, granting wishes as he continues to search for his own love?  Does his unfulfilled desire continue to have influence on those who call Finley home?  What will it take to finally unite two souls meant to be together?

Forever Finley is a collection of stand-alone yet interconnected short stories; when read cover to cover, the stories build like chapters in a novel.  As a whole, Forever Finley explores the many facets of love – whether that love takes the form of friendship, romance, or passion for one’s life calling.  These warm, uplifting, often magical tales detail loss and perseverance, the strength of the human spirit, and the ability of love to endure…forever.

Today, I’m back with Holly Schindler to talk about her short story cycle, FOREVER FINLEY. Yesterday we talked about the process of writing and indie publishing a new short story each month, and today we’re digging into the stories Holly tells.

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 COURTNEY: I read the stories as you released them each month, and I have to say that they were perfect for 2016 because they felt so gentle in what was not, in many ways, a gentle time. Finley didn’t feel like it was really part of this world—in a good way. Is Finley based on any real place? (True Confessions: Our family photographer has her studio on the town square in a little town called Metamora, Illinois, and the first time I saw the town square, I said, “That’s Finley!” So Metamora plays Finley in my head.)

I love that description of the series feeling gentle. I really hope that readers continue to have that feeling in 2017.

As far as the setting goes, I live in Springfield, MO—third largest city in the state, home of Springfield Style Cashew Chicken and Brad Pitt. But it’s also got a real small town feel—and it’s surrounded by little towns (Ozark, Fair Grove) with old-fashioned small town squares. I did have Ozark, MO in my head quite a bit when I depicted the Finley town square. There’s even a river that runs through Ozark called Finley. I take my dog to walk at the Finley River Park quite a bit—and had that area in my head when I wrote about Founders Park in Finley.

Springfield also has a National Cemetery that I had in my mind’s eye from the very beginning, when I wrote “Come December.” It’s right across the street from an apartment building—just as Finley’s National Cemetery is located near Natalie’s apartment complex. You can see more in my short video.

COURTNEY: So now we know where Finley’s name comes from! FOREVER FINLEY touches a lot of genres, including historical fiction, contemporary fiction, ghost stories, magical realism, new adult, boomer lit. And you’ve written in a lot of those genres, so FOREVER FINLEY brings all that together. How would you classify it? Are there any books or other stories that particularly influenced the book?

I really love stories with a strong sense of local color—any story in which the setting feels like a character (I even love the way the café in Flagg’s FRIED GREEN TOMATOES feels like a character). That was a big part of putting this book together. I’m also an old lit major, and was surely influenced by those Victorian classics that were initially serialized.

I think one of my favorite parts of FOREVER FINLEY is that there’s no one right way to read it. As I was writing it in 2016, I felt that each story, while connected to the others, had to truly stand on its own. (That way, readers who discovered the July story on Amazon wouldn’t feel lost when they purchased it.) Now that the stories are all collected into one volume, you certainly can read cover to cover. But you can also read the stories out of order—the same way you skip around an album, listening to random songs, even returning to the same song several times before moving on. For those who’d like to bounce around rather than reading straight through, I’ve included a detailed table of contents at the beginning of the book, which allows you to get a glimpse of what each story is about.

Courtney: I love making connections between art forms, so comparing the cycle to an album is right up my alley. What else would you like readers to know about FOREVER FINLEY?

I’ve just revamped the cover of the series. I liked the first cover—I think it spoke to the historical element of the book—but it wasn’t as mysterious, romantic, or intriguing as it could have been. To celebrate the book’s new “skin,” I’m giving away a review copy of the series to one lucky reader—either e-book (it’s listed in KU, so it’s only available in Kindle form) or paperback. To enter, shoot me an email at hollyschindlerbooks (at) gmail (dot) com.

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You can also check out FINLEY and all my other works at my Amazon page: https://www.amazon.com/Holly-Schindler/e/B003E3TJ7U

Or visit my author site: HollySchindler.com

Courtney: Thanks for being here, Holly! If you’re reading this, I hope you’ll either enter            Holly’s contest or check out FOREVER FINLEY on her Amazon page.

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Filed under Author Interviews, Publishing, Reading, What I'm Reading, Writing

Talking About FOREVER FINLEY with Author Holly Schindler (Part 1)

Today, I’m excited to have my friend Holly Schindler here to talk about her short story cycle, Forever Finley.

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Here’s the description from Holly’s website:

True love never dies – or so Amos Hargrove, a brave Civil War soldier who lost his beloved before they could marry, still believes.  His spirit, some say, pervades the town he founded and named for his sweet fair-haired young beauty.  In Finley, dreams come true, love blossoms, and second chances are unearthed.  Is Amos’s spirit truly at work, granting wishes as he continues to search for his own love?  Does his unfulfilled desire continue to have influence on those who call Finley home?  What will it take to finally unite two souls meant to be together?

Forever Finley is a collection of stand-alone yet interconnected short stories; when read cover to cover, the stories build like chapters in a novel.  As a whole, Forever Finley explores the many facets of love – whether that love takes the form of friendship, romance, or passion for one’s life calling.  These warm, uplifting, often magical tales detail loss and perseverance, the strength of the human spirit, and the ability of love to endure…forever.

COURTNEY: Today, we’re talking about the writing and publishing of FOREVER FINLEY. Can you tell us about the writing process? What were some pros and cons of writing and publishing a new short story each month?

HOLLY: I honestly didn’t plan on writing one a month when I wrote the first installment. In late 2015, I indie published “Come December,” thinking it would simply be a stand-alone holiday short story. But the story really took off in a surprising way. I moved a ton of copies—readers were coming to my work for the first time, dropping me messages about having enjoyed the piece. It made its way into the hands (and tablets and Kindles) of so many new readers that I thought, “It’d be a real shame to leave it at that. I’d like to continue the story.”

But how?

The obvious answer probably would have been to catch up with Natalie again (the protag of “Come December”). I was actually more interested in the setting, though. What kind of place would allow Natalie to meet George (another character from “Come December”)? It seemed a magical place. A sweet place. A place I really would like to return to time and again. As I brainstormed, it suddenly became clear that I had enough ideas to return to Finley once a month throughout 2016…

 

come decemberCOURTNEY: Like many readers, I came to FOREVER FINLEY through “Come December.” I’m a sucker for a good holiday story—it’s all I read in December—and good new reads can be hard to find. But you took it past the holidays. What were some pros and cons of writing and publishing a new short story each month?

The pros of a publishing a new story each month? Learning to go with my gut. I’ve been writing full-time since 2001 (my first book was accepted in 2009). As we all know, the process of first draft to publication is fraught with rejection. And after you sell a book, you’re then inundated with editorial letters and reviews. Everyone has their own opinions, identifying various strengths and weaknesses. You could almost get whiplash from it all! Most dangerously, though, you can begin to doubt yourself.

COURTNEY: Yes! One of the toughest things about drafting and revision is knowing which feedback to take seriously and which to let go. Which is helpful and necessary, and which is a very subjective matter of opinion or personal preference? I bet it was a relief to bypass all that in this project, but I’m sure it was also nerve-wracking to put work into the world without it.

HOLLY: Once I decided to turn “Come December” into the FOREVER FINLEY series, I was shocked at how quickly a month could go by! (Which was really the only downside.) I was never without new ideas. But I was also working on full-length projects as well. In 2016, I indie published an adult novel (MILES LEFT YET) and my first illustrated children’s book (WORDQUAKE). My fourth YA (SPARK) also released with HarperCollins. And in the midst of all that, I was always working on a new FINLEY story—which required its own cover and synopsis in order to list them on KDP, Nook Press, iBooks, etc. Going at that pace, I couldn’t second-guess myself. I wrote; I gave each story my all; I revised and polished; I published. I learned a ton about cover creation and writing eye-catching copy. And my readers taught me that while revision is always required, often your first instincts regarding a piece are the best.

COURTNEY: I’ve always been in awe of how prolific you are, and now you’re doing traditional and indie publishing. Can you tell us about the experience of being a hybrid author? Why was indie publishing the right path for FOREVER FINLEY?

One of the best things I think I’ve done for myself is go hybrid. Obviously, FOREVER FINLEY never would have been released in regular, short installments with a traditional publisher. (The best I could have hoped for going traditional would be to sell a few stories to periodicals, then collect them into a single volume.) That’s the great thing about indie—independently published works are no longer books that aren’t “good” enough to be published. They’re just not a good fit for the traditional publishing platform.

Obviously, genre lit (romance, mystery, etc.) were the first works to really take off in the indie world, but I’m anxious to see more experimental, literary authors come to indie pubbing as well. The door is wide-open in terms of what’s possible. One of the best parts of having your foot in both worlds is that you can really start to see how traditional publishing and indie publishing influence and affect each other.

COURTNEY: I’m excited about the possibilities for indie publishing, both as a reader and as a writer. It’s giving us so many opportunities to do high quality work that for whatever reason, just doesn’t fit with a traditional publisher. Short stories are a great example of that.

 I’d like to thank Holly for being here today, and to invite you to join us tomorrow, when we’ll talk about the stories Holly tells in FOREVER FINLEY.

 In the meantime, check out Holly’s work at her Amazon author page

or at HollySchindler.com.

 

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